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Scientific Research Finds the Most Effective Nutrients for Combating Diabetes

A look at the Clinical Trials and Research for Gymnema Sylvestre, Trigonella Foenum Graecum, Magnesium Oxide, Zinc Gluconate, Vitamin B6, Chromium Picolinate and Vitamin B12 for Diabetes

INSELPlus-Diabetes-Scientific

The Problem

Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood that affects more than 115 million people (36% of the population) in the United States, but the exact cause is still relatively unknown. Symptoms are variable and can differ from day to day and from one person to another, making it extremely difficult to predict in advance the manifestations one will experience while combating the condition. However, the majority of people will struggle with the following; excessive thirst and increased urination, fatigue, unexplained weight loss, blurred vision and extreme hunger.

Unfortunately, there is no current cure for Diabetes and the people dealing with the condition can only hope to manage their symptoms. However, there are steps that can be taken to lower the incidence of these symptoms. While most doctors would suggest a treatment that consists of conventional medicine, there is a much more natural course that can be taken.

Read on to learn more about the research, for each nutrient, which has strong scientific backing for being statistically significant methods of helping alleviate Diabetes.

The Solutions

1. Gymnema Sylvestre

A Scientific Study

Gymnema Sylvestre, also known as Gurmar, is a kind of herb that is found in relatively high doses in certain dietary supplements. While there are numerous positive therapeutic benefits, the most important ones include; treating diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cough. According to the NIH, most of the United States population ingest far too little Gymnema Sylvestre in their daily food intake.

The Conclusion

These results indicate that dihydroxy gymnemic triacetate, the compound from Gymnema sylvestre, possessed hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activity in long-term treatment and hence it could be used as a drug for treating diabetes.

The Method

An active compound dihydroxy gymnemic triacetate has been isolated from Gymnema sylvestre acetone extract and its optimum dose has been determined and patented. An optimum dose of dihydroxy gymnemic triacetate (20 mg/kg body weight) was orally administered for 45 days to diabetics for the assessment of plasma glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), tissue glycogen, lipid parameters such as triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol.

The Results

Dihydroxy gymnemic triacetate at 20 mg dose produced significant effects on all biochemical parameters studied compared to diabetic control group.

Link to Study

 

2. Trigonella Foenum Graecum

A Scientific Study

Trigonella Foenum Graecum, also known as Fenugreek, is a kind of herb that is found in relatively high doses in certain dietary supplements. While there are numerous positive therapeutic benefits, the most important ones include; controlling high blood sugar, increasing the production of hormones that stimulate the production of prolactin and increasing breast. According to the NIH, most of the United States population ingest far too little Trigonella Foenum Graecum in their daily food intake.

The Conclusion

Dietary supplementation of 10 g Fenugreek/day in prediabetes subjects was associated with lower conversion to diabetes with no adverse effects and beneficial possibly due to its decreased insulin resistance.

The Method

A 3-year randomized, controlled, parallel study for efficacy of Fenugreek (n = 66) and matched controls (n = 74) was conducted in men and women aged 30-70 years with criteria of prediabetes. Fenugreek powder, 5 g twice a day before meals, was given to study subjects and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was monitored at baseline and every 3 months for the 3-year study.

The Results

By the end of intervention period, cumulative incidence rate of diabetes reduced significantly in Fenugreek group when compared to controls. The Fenugreek group also saw a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPPG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) whereas serum insulin increased significantly. It was observed that controls had 4.2 times higher chance of developing diabetes compared to subjects in the Fenugreek group. The outcome of diabetes in Fenugreek group was positively associated with serum insulin and negatively associated with insulin resistance (HOMA IR).

Link to Study

 

3. Magnesium Oxide

A Scientific Study

Magnesium Oxide, also known as MgO, is a kind of chemical compound that is found in relatively high doses in cashews, buckwheat, mustard, almonds and pistachios. While there are numerous positive therapeutic benefits, the most important ones include; prevening and treating low amounts of magnesium in the blood, helping the normal functioning of cells, nerves, muscles, bones, and the heart. According to the NIH, most of the United States population ingest far too little Magnesium Oxide in their daily food intake.

The Conclusion

Mg depletion is common in poorly controlled patientswith type 2 diabetes, especially in those with neuropathy or coronary disease. More prolonged use of Mg in doses that are higher than usual is needed toestablish its routine or selective administration in patients with type 2 diabetes to improve control or prevent chronic complications.

The Method

128 patients with type 2 diabetes (32 men, 96 women, aged 30–69 years) were treated by diet or diet plus oral antidiabetic drugs, in the Bahia Federal University Hospital, Brazil. Patients at risk for hypomagnesemia or with reduced renal function were excluded. This study was a clinical randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Patients received either placebo, 20.7 mmol MgO, or 41.4 mmol MgO daily(elementary Mg) for 30 days. Mg concentrations were measured in plasma, in mononuclear cells, and in 24-h urine samples. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1, and fructosamine were used as parameters of metabolic control.

The Results

Of the patients, 47.7% had low plasma Mg, and 31.1% had low intramononuclear Mg levels. Intracellular Mg in patients with diabetes was significantly lower than in the normal population (62 blood donors; 1.4 ± 0.6 vs. 1.7 ± 0.6 μg/mg of total proteins). No correlation was found between plasma and intracellular Mg concentrations (r = −0.179; P = 0.15) or between Mg concentrations and glycemic control (r = −0.165; P = 0.12). Intracellular Mg levels were lower in patients with peripheral neuropathy than in those without (1.2 ± 0.5 vs. 1.5 ± 0.6 μg/mg). Similar findings were observed in patients with coronary disease (1.0 ± 0.5 vs. 1.5 ± 0.6 μg/mg). In the placebo and in the 20.7 mmol Mg groups, neither a change in plasma and intracellular levels nor an improvement in glycemic control were observed. Replacement with 41.4 mmol Mg tended to increase plasma, cellular, and urine Mg and caused a significant fall (4.1 ± 0.8 to 3.8 ± 0.7 mmol/1) in fructosamine (normal, 1.87–2.87 mmol/1).

Link to Study

 

4. Zinc Gluconate

A Scientific Study

Zinc Gluconate, also known as Zincum gluconicum, is a kind of chemical compound that is found in relatively high doses in liver, peanuts, beef, cheese and beans. While there are numerous positive therapeutic benefits, the most important ones include; supporting normal condition of hair, nails, skin, helping to puberty and continuing posterity. According to the NIH, most of the United States population ingest far too little Zinc Gluconate in their daily food intake.

The Conclusion

The data suggest the potential beneficial antioxidant effects of Zn supplementation in persons with type 2 DM. These results are particularly important in light of the deleterious consequences of oxidative stress in persons with diabetes.

The Method

Adult subjects with HbA1c ≥7.5% were supplemented for six months with 30 mg/day of Zn as Zn gluconate or placebo. The effects of supplementation on plasma zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), urinary Zn, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase activities (GPX) in red blood cells, blood lipids and lipoproteins, HbA1c and fasting glucose were measured at the beginning of the study and after three and six months.

The Results

At the beginning of the study, more than 30% of the subjects exhibited plasma Zn values less than the normal minimum of 10.7 μmol/L, whereas levels of plasma Cu and antioxidant RBC Cu-Zn SOD and GPx enzyme activities were in the normal ranges. Oxidative stress, monitored by plasma TBARS, was increased in individuals with diabetes compared with healthy Tunisian subjects (3.32 ± 0.05 μmol/L vs. 2.08 ± 0.04 μmol/L) and an inverse correlation was found between Zn plasma levels and plasma TBARS. After three and six months of Zn supplementation, all of the subjects exhibited plasma Zn values greater than 10.7 μmol/L. There was a decrease of plasma TBARS in Zn supplemented group after six months (15%) with no significant changes in the placebo group. Supplementation did not alter significantly HbA1c nor glucose homeostasis. No adverse effects of Zn supplementation were observed on Cu status or HDL cholesterol.

Link to Study

 

5. Vitamin B6

A Scientific Study

Vitamin B6, also known as Pyridoxal phosphate, is a kind of vitamin that is found in relatively high doses in beans, walnut, buckthorn, bananas and tuna. While there are numerous positive therapeutic benefits, the most important ones include; helping proper brain development and function, helping the body make melatonin and involving in constructing coenzymes. According to the NIH, most of the United States population ingest far too little Vitamin B6 in their daily food intake.

The Conclusion

Treatment with vitamin B6 makes the production of xanthurenic-acid normal by restoring tryptophan metabolism and improves the oral glucose tolerance in patients with gestational diabetes.

The Method

Fourteen pregnant women were shown by the oral glucose tolerance test to have gestational diabetes. In 13 an increased urinary xanthurenic-acid excretion after an oral load of L-tryptophan indicated a relative pyridoxine deficiency. All patients were treated with vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 100 mg/day for 14 days by mouth.

The Results

By the end of the trial, only two patients had sufficiently impaired glucose tolerance to justify the diagnosis of gestational diabetes.

Link to Study

 

6. Chromium Picolinate

A Scientific Study

Chromium Picolinate, also known as CrPic3, is a kind of chemical compound that is found in relatively high doses in beef, liver, eggs, chicken and oysters. While there are numerous positive therapeutic benefits, the most important ones include; controlling blood sugar in prediabetes, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and reducing high blood sugar due to taking steroids. According to the NIH, most of the United States population ingest far too little Chromium Picolinate in their daily food intake.

The Conclusion

Over one-half the adult US population consumes nutritional supplements, and over one-quarter consumes supplemental chromium. The odds of having T2D were lower in those who, in the previous 30 d, had consumed supplements containing chromium.

The Method

An individual was defined as having diabetes if he or she had a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) value of ≥6.5%, or reported having been diagnosed with diabetes. Data on all consumed dietary supplements from the NHANES database were analyzed, with the OR of having diabetes as the main outcome of interest based on chromium supplement use.

The Results

The NHANES for the years 1999-2010 included information on 62,160 individuals. After filtering the database for the required covariates (gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, body mass index, diabetes diagnosis, supplement usage, and laboratory HbA1c values), and when restricted to adults, the study cohort included 28,539 people. A total of 58.3% of people reported consuming a dietary supplement in the previous 30 d, 28.8% reported consuming a dietary supplement that contained chromium, and 0.7% consumed supplements that had "chromium" in the title. Compared with nonusers, the odds of having T2D (HbA1c ≥6.5%) were lower in persons who consumed chromium-containing supplements within the previous 30 d than in those who did not (OR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.86; P = 0.001). Supplement use alone (without chromium) did not influence the odds of having T2D (OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.03; P = 0.11).

Link to Study

 

7. Vitamin B12

A Scientific Study

Vitamin B12, also known as Cobalamin, is a kind of vitamin that is found in relatively high doses in liver, octopus, fish, cheese and eggs. While there are numerous positive therapeutic benefits, the most important ones include; supporting adrenal function, maintaining a healthy nervous system and doing DNA synthesis. According to the NIH, most of the United States population ingest far too little Vitamin B12 in their daily food intake.

The Conclusion

Maternal vitamin B(12) deficiency is associated with increased adiposity and, in turn, with insulin resistance and GDM. Vitamin B(12) deficiency may be an important factor underlying the high risk of 'diabesity'.

The Method

Women (N = 785) attending the antenatal clinics of one hospital in Mysore, India, had their anthropometry, insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-2) and glucose tolerance assessed at 30 weeks' gestation (100 g oral glucose tolerance test; Carpenter-Coustan criteria) and at 5 years after delivery (75 g OGTT; WHO, 1999). Gestational vitamin B(12) and folate concentrations were measured in stored plasma samples.

The Results

Low vitamin B(12) concentrations (≤150 pmol/l, B(12) deficiency) were observed in 43% of women and low folate concentrations (≤7 nmol/l) in 4%. B(12)-deficient women had higher body mass index (p ≤ 0.001), sum of skinfold thickness (p ≤ 0.001), insulin resistance (p = 0.02) and a higher incidence of GDM (8.7% vs 4.6%; OR 2.1, p = 0.02; p = 0.1 after adjusting for BMI) than non-deficient women. Among B(12)-deficient women, the incidence of GDM increased with folate concentration (5.4%, 10.5%, 10.9% from lowest to highest tertile, p = 0.04; p for interaction = 0.2). Vitamin B(12) deficiency during pregnancy was positively associated with skinfold thickness, insulin resistance (p ≤ 0.05) and diabetes prevalence at 5 year follow-up (p = 0.009; p = 0.008 after adjusting for BMI).

Link to Study

 

The Takeaway

To summarize, in the article, we have gone through 7 supplements which were determined as extremely effective in combating Diabetes. The basis of this assertion comes solely from scientific research, clinical trials, and studies published in respectable journals. While some of these nutrients can be obtained from foods alone, it is strongly recommended, for those suffering from Diabetes, to take a regular daily dose of supplementation to ensure sufficient intake to meet clinical needs.

However, when taking so many different supplementations it is critical to take specific dosages in order to avoid damaging what you’re trying to fix. It is for this exact reason that SpecifiCare’s expert Debra Waldoks, RDN, MPH has created a specific formula for people with Diabetes. By taking the formula, you raise your chances of starting to feel better and experience reduced Diabetes related symptoms.

 

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